"If you like your romance delivered with a side of kick-butt, then Louise Rozett is the author for you. The Confessions series has my heart in its fist—I'm completely breathless to know what happens to Rose Zarelli and Jamie Forta."

—Emmy Laybourne, the Monument 14 series

PRESS

(aka, some of the nice things people have said)

(Well, you didn't think I was going to put the bad things on here, did you?)

(More coming...)

PRESS

(aka, some of the nice things people have said)

(Well, you didn't think I was going to put the bad things on here, did you?)

(More coming...)

"Rozett maintains her pacing through the rhythms of Rose’s school year and gives the reader diamond-bright flashes of insight through Rose’s inner dialogue, including the realization that a random compliment from a friend can “fill up all the empty spaces I haven’t known what to do with lately.” This is a strong follow-up to Confessions of an Angry Girl (2012), with vivid language and deft character development that puts Rose into the leagues of Ruby Oliver from E. Lockhart’s The Boyfriend List (2005) and Jessica Darling from Megan McCafferty’s Sloppy Firsts (2001) and Second Helpings (2003). Thematically, Rose’s journey will appeal to fans of Sarah Dessen. It’s clear that there’s more forthcoming in the Confessions series, so crank up Rose’s playlist, included in the back matter, and mark Rozett as an author to track."

—Erin Downey Howerton on Confessions of an Almost-Girlfriend, Booklist

PRESS

(aka, some of the nice things people have said)

(Well, you didn't think I was going to put the bad things on here, did you?)

(More coming...)

"Louise Rozett delivers a debut novel that is in turns sweet, heartbreaking, and empowering."


— Elizabeth Eulberg (Take a Bow)

on Confessions of an Angry Girl

PRESS

(aka, some of the nice things people have said)

(Well, you didn't think I was going to put the bad things on here, did you?)

(More coming...)

writer of books, plays, WEb series, letters, emails, tweets, texts, etc.

"All girls have been there! You want to be independent, you want to be okay with a guy turning away from you, you want to be all confident and feel six-feet tall whenever you enter a room. But you also want love. You want it so bad that you second guess your own worth, your own opinions, your own decisions. Rose realises that she wants both, and—more importantly—she deserves both. She deserves respect and love. And maybe it's a big thing to ask for, but she's worth it. And she won't settle for anything less."


​—Booknut 101, 21st Century Once Upon a Time blog